“I’m not here to be average, I’m here to be awesome.”

I read an great post at LinkedIn with points I want to share with you.

As co-founder of Hotwire.com and CEO of Zillow for the last seven years, 39-year-old Spencer Rascoff fits most people’s definition of success. He is a father of three. What is the one thing that Spencer refuses to do on the weekend? Work—at least, in the traditional sense. Rascoff says:

My weekends are an important time to unplug from the day-to-day and get a chance to think more deeply about my company and my industry. Weekends are a great chance to reflect and be more introspective about bigger issues.

new study from Stanford shows that Rascoff is on to something. Successful people know the importance of shifting gears on the weekend to relaxing and rejuvenating activities. They use their weekends to create a better week ahead. The following list contains 10 things that successful people do to find balance on the weekend and to come into work at 110% on Monday morning.

1. Disconnect

Disconnecting is the most important weekend strategy on this list, because if you can’t find a way to remove yourself electronically from your work Friday evening through Monday morning, then you’ve never really left work. Making yourself available to your work 24/7 exposes you to a constant barrage of stressors that prevent you from refocusing and recharging. If taking the entire weekend off handling work e-mails and calls isn’t realistic, try designating specific times on Saturday and Sunday for checking e-mails and responding to voicemails. Scheduling short blocks of time will alleviate stress without sacrificing availability.

2. Minimize chores

Chores have a funny habit of completely taking over your weekends. When this happens, you lose the opportunity to relax and reflect. What’s worse is that a lot of chores feel like work, and if you spend all weekend doing them, you just put in a seven-day workweek. To keep this from happening, you need to schedule your chores like you would anything else during the week.

3. Reflect

Weekly reflection is a powerful tool for improvement. Use the weekend to contemplate the larger forces that are shaping your industry, your organization, and your job. Without the distractions of Monday to Friday busy work, you should be able to see things in a whole new light. Use this insight to alter your approach to the coming week, improving the efficiency and efficacy of your work.

4. Exercise

Exercise is also a great way to come up with new ideas. Innovators and other successful people know that being outdoors often sparks creativity. Exercise leads to endorphin-fueled introspection. The key is to find a physical activity that does this for you and then to make it an important part of your weekend routine.

5. Pursue a passion

You might be surprised what happens when you pursue something you’re passionate about on weekends. Indulging your passions is a great way to escape stress and to open your mind to new ways of thinking.

6. Spend quality time with closed-ones

7. Schedule micro-adventures

Buy tickets to a concert or play, or get reservations for that cool new hotel that just opened downtown. Instead of running on a treadmill, plan a hike. Anticipating something good to come is a significant part of what makes the activity pleasurable.

8. Wake up at the same time

Your body cycles through an elaborate series of sleep phases in order for you to wake up rested and refreshed. One of these phases involves preparing your mind to be awake and alert, which is why people often wake up just before their alarm clock goes off (the brain is trained and ready). When you sleep past your regular wake-up time on the weekend, you end up feeling groggy and tired. This isn’t just disruptive to your day off, it also makes you less productive on Monday because your brain isn’t ready to wake up at your regular time. If you need to catch up on sleep, just go to bed earlier.

9. Designate mornings as “me time”

Finding a way to engage in an activity you’re passionate about first thing in the morning can pay massive dividends in happiness and cleanliness of mind. It’s also a great way to perfect your circadian rhythm by forcing yourself to wake up at the same time you do on weekdays. Your mind achieves peak performance two-to-four hours after you wake up, so get up early to do something physical, and then sit down and engage in something mental while your mind is at its peak.

10. Prepare for the upcoming week

The weekend is a great time to spend a few moments planning your upcoming week. As little as 30 minutes of planning can yield significant gains in productivity and reduced stress. The week feels a lot more manageable when you go into it with a plan because all you have to focus on is execution.

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I truly underwrite each point and thus wanted to share them. To find your maximal potential, foster creativity and personal development, be a inspiring person to be around, taking care of yourself is crucial. For me, exercising is in inseparable part of my life. I disconnect myself for some time every day. Most of my closed ones know that I love the flight mode. 😀 Steady sleeping pattern is best nurture and meditation for your body. I reflect through writing, planning. I receive and let go through yoga and meditation. For me, morning yoga is simply the best way to start a day. Spending quality time with my loved ones acts as therapy as well as a source of inspiration for me. I feel rejuvenated after these special moments. On Sundays or Monday mornings, I make sure to set my weekly goals and to do lists to get a feeling of being organised and determined. I’d add something to the list treat yourself with little things daily: be it dark chocolate, cappuccino, yoga, red wine, walk with a friend -whatever makes your day a bit more luxurious. Also, talking about your dreams and vision out loud is never harmful. You’d be surprised how inspired you can be and also how happy it makes you to inspire others through genuine excitement. 

xx, S

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